Mark Jankowski

 

Listen with a PMP E.A.R.

by Mark Jankowski

PMP earWhen a person is under pressure or in a difficult situation, their emotions can start to get the best of them. Even the best solution to their problem may be missed because they are so caught up in the situation. The best way to deal with this situation is to downshift emotions as much as possible so that positive progress is possible. To do this you need to use your E.A.R. It will help defuse some of the emotions so a solution to the problem can be found.

Empathize: Let the other person know that you recognize that he or she is under emotional stress or pressure and that you’ve been in similarly difficult situations.

Ask: Take the time to ask a couple of nonthreatening questions to gain valuable information and to let the other person vent his or her emotions

Reassure: Let the other person know that you believe, in time or with remedies, the situation will defuse and/or improve.

Follow this simple acronym and you will be ready to overcome the emotional obstacles of others.

If you found these tips from Mark Jankowski of value and are a PMP looking to earn PMI PDUs, you might be interested in his self-paced, downloadable courses at PDUs2Go.com.

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Looking for Project Management Training or PDUs for PMP Certification? Download 5 PMP PDUs for FREE and see how easy it is to do both at the same time!

The Big L

by Mark Jankowski

ListeningAn article by Cynthia Crossen from The Wall Street Journal a few years back reported that, “Most people speak at a rate of 120 to 150 words a minute, but the human brain can easily process more than 500 words a minute, leaving plenty of time for mental fidgeting.” Herein lays one of the great obstacles to effective listening. We have the biological capability to listen to everything, yet we often miss a lot of information because we get bored or disinterested.

In a negotiation, the last thing you want to do is lose out on information. Everything the other side says is potentially valuable to help you make a deal. Let the other side talk as much as they want. Listen between the lines to what is said and what is omitted. Listen for nuance and emotion. Listen with your eyes to see their mannerisms and comfort level with each topic. All the material you need to make the deal is there, it’s just up to you to gather it.

When it is your time to speak, make what you say count. Don’t feel obligated to match the amount of time they spoke for. Say what you need to frame the issues and keep moving forward on the key issues of the negotiation. The less you say, the more others will remember.

Think of it this way: the best negotiators aren’t only smooth talkers, they’re smooth listeners too.

If you found these tips from Mark Jankowski of value and are a PMP looking to earn PMI PDUs, you might be interested in his self-paced, downloadable courses at PDUs2Go.com.

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PDUs2Go.com can help you maintain your PMP Certification whether you need one PMP PDU or 60 PMP PDUs. Try 5 PMP PDUs for FREE and see how easy it is to Earn n’ Learn™ while in your car, in your office, by the pool, or on the road!

3 Ways a PMP Project Manager can Unlock Deadlocks

by Mark Jankowski

meetingThe room is dark and hazy.  The man across the table from you puffs on his cigar.  A cloud of smoke slowly plumes out of his mouth and rises towards the low-hanging overhead light above the table before dissipating into the air.  A small bead of sweat begins to trickle down your forehead.  Without unlocking your eyes from his, you slide a piece of paper across the table with another new proposal.  He grabs the paper and stares back at you.  The small bead of sweat finally slides down your face and drops onto your shirt.

Okay, maybe your negotiation is not this dramatic or intense.  Still, a deadlocked negotiation can be a difficult thing to get around.  Perhaps you can’t agree on the price or timing.  Maybe it’s an issue of control.  Whatever it is, a new approach needs to be taken so that the deadlock can be broken and a deal can be reached.   So how do you do this?

Change Locations

If you’ve been meeting at your office, offer to go to theirs.  A change in scenery can be good for both parties.  Sometimes a setting can be intimidating, stifling, stale, or negative.  Staring at the same walls can become boring.  Imagination and energies can wane.  Maybe the negotiators have begun to subconsciously associate the surroundings with a lack of progress.  By switching locations, both parties get a new perspective.  They’ll be in a different room, in a different seat, facing a new direction.  It may not seem logical, but attitudes can shift with locales.

Change Negotiators

Maybe you’re the problem.  It may not mean that you’re negotiating poorly, but that the other party isn’t hearing you anymore.  (You may be guilty of the same thing in reverse).  They are frustrated with how the negotiation has gone and may have tuned
you out.   Instead of being stuck at this impasse, bring in a substitute.  Let your partner or associate take over.  A fresh face with a new style can jump-start the stalled negotiation.

Call in a Mediator

This is a more dramatic suggestion to changing negotiators.  If both sides are stuck without a way out, a mediator may be the best option.  This person must be an expert in negotiations, but not necessarily in the specific topic.  They only need to understand the fundamentals well enough to facilitate progress.  The mediator does not need to get bogged down with the small details—something that has probably happened to both sides.  Instead, the mediator should be focused on the broad goals of the deal.

If you found these tips from Mark Jankowski of value and are a PMP looking to earn PMI PDUs, you might be interested in his self-paced, downloadable courses at PDUs2Go.com.

__________________________________________

PDUs2Go.com can help you maintain your PMP Certification whether you need one PMP PDU or 60 PMP PDUs. Try 5 PMP PDUs for FREE and see how easy it is to Earn n’ Learn™ while in your car, in your office, by the pool, or on the road!

Learning WIN-win Negotiations as a PMP Project Manager from a 2-Year-Old

by Mark Jankowski

TODDLEROne of the key philosophies we believe in is that both sides can win in a negotiation.  This does not mean that both sides can get everything they want.  Rather, it means both sides can walk away from a negotiation satisfied.  One side will always “WIN”, but the other side can also “win”.  To be an effective WIN-win negotiator, you have to be able to identify what you really want and what the other side really wants.

The following is an excerpt from the book “The Power of NICE” by Ron Shapiro, Mark Jankowski, and Jim Dale. Mark likes to tell a story about his niece that shows how a clever 2-year-old was able to utilize Win-win negotiation to get what she wanted.

Adrienne, my 2-year-old niece, displayed one of the more effective uses of the WIN-win maxim: “The best way to get what you want is to help them get what they want.”  Adrienne likes nothing better than being carried around, all day long, every day, but her parents, wanting her to realize that when you grow up, you don’t get carried around, wanted to break her of this habit.  When her pleading, “Pick me up!” began to go unanswered, she modified her approach.  In no time, she was looking up at her parents, offering her outstretched arms, saying, “Hug.  Hug!”  Who could ignore that affectionate request?  Then, when her father bent down to give his little princess a hug, Adrienne would latch onto his neck, he’d straighten up, and guess what?—she was being carried around.  She got what she wanted—being carried—by giving him what he wanted—a hug.

If you found these tips from Mark Jankowski of value and are a PMP looking to earn PMI PDUs, you might be interested in his self-paced, downloadable courses at PDUs2Go.com.

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Looking for Project Management Training or PDUs for PMP Certification? Download 5 PMP PDUs for FREE and see how easy it is to do both at the same time!

 
 
 
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