Jennifer Bridges, PMP

 

How to register your PDUs from PDUs2Go.com with PMI

By Jennifer Bridges, PMP

The Project Management Institute (PMI) has recently made some changes to the PDU registration system.

This post is intended to help you with the registration process so that you can get credit for your PDUs quickly and easily.

The new web site address for registering your PDUs with PMI is https://ccrs.pmi.org/.

This is the “Continuing Certification Requirements System” page.

On this page, you will see a section labeled “PMI Login.”

Here you will enter your PMI Username and Password then click the “Log In” button.

Once logged into your PMI account, you will follow the instructions online to log your PDUs.

Please reference your LETTER OF COMPLETION in your PDUs2Go.com account for the following information you will need when registering your PDUs with PMI:

  1. REP Number
  2. ACTIVITY NUMBER
  3. PDU SKILL AREAS

Learn More »

How to Register your PDUs with PMI

By Jennifer Bridges, PMP

The Project Management Institute (PMI) has recently made some changes to the PDU registration system.

This post is intended to help you with the registration process so that you can get credit for your PDUs quickly and easily.

The new web site address for registering your PDUs with PMI is https://ccrs.pmi.org/.

This is the “Continuing Certification Requirements System” page.

On this page, you will see a section labeled “PMI Login.”

Here you will enter your PMI Username and Password then click the “Log In” button.

Once logged into your PMI account, you will follow the instructions online to log your PDUs.

Please reference your LETTER OF COMPLETION in your PDUs2Go.com account for the following information you will need when registering your PDUs with PMI:

  1. REP Number
  2. ACTIVITY NUMBER
  3. PDU SKILL AREAS

Learn More »

Like A Song On the Radio, Make Your Words Unforgettable

Pretty woman mouth blowing hand drawn icons and symbols close upYour tone of voice can have a greater impact on your powers of persuasion than the words you use. There’s no doubt that your voice is a powerful instrument.

But what are you doing to control it? There are distinct methods to make your message as haunting or as catchy as a song on the radio so that people are singing your praises.

Think of a really memorable talk or presentation you attended recently – one that moved you or changed the way you view the world.

What was it that stayed with you? Was it the speaker’s words, or was it the tone of voice that moved you? The odds are high that the speaker’s passion came through – broke through the barriers of your mind so the words could captivate your heart.

Maybe you felt it in the quiver of their voice as they told an emotional story. Perhaps it was a sudden change in their volume – a whisper or a shout that rattled you in your boots.

You might have been influenced by their tone of voice when they asked a thought-provoking key question. Perhaps it was the sheer pace of the words – staccato as a machine gun – that tumbled out of a mouth straining to keep up with inspiration.

The fact that you’re thinking about it now is a testament to the power of the human voice.

How To Become Impossible To Forget

All of these elements tap the rich array of the capabilities of the voice, making it possible to influence others and communicate with passion.

It’s the sad truth that too many discussions, speeches and presentations are easy to forget. We certainly want what we say to be remembered, especially when the project’s success and completion depend on it. And that’s a problem because the reason anyone would want to talk with you or listen to you is to engage in memorable, meaningful communication. One of the most potent yet often overlooked facets of vocal communication is the instrument itself – the voice.

Whether you’re addressing an audience of one or one thousand, you’re engaged in public speaking each time you open your mouth to speak in a public place.

So how are you coming across? When you speak, are people reminded of the dulcet tones of a rippling brook… or are they shrinking, as if from the shrill sound of fingernails slowly raked across a blackboard?

No matter where you find yourself today, as a novice or a master, you can learn to use your voice for a more lasting effect and become unforgettable.

Speaking of Dynamics…

The dynamics of your message will come through much more clearly when you color your message with a range of volume, tone and rhythm that conveys your emotional intensity. Your voice and intonation make all the difference in how you come across.

There are three basic elements that you can tap to ensure your verbal messages are understood – and remembered – time and again.

Volume:

Before you can communicate effectively, it’s essential that you really connect what you want to say, who you’re talking to, and why they might want to listen. Match the purpose of your words with your volume.

The human voice has a dramatic dynamic range, from the intensity of a whisper to the full, rich command of a shout. If your voice is too soft, you risk coming across as mousy. Too loud, and your audience will tune out. Make sure your message is fully heard so that people catch the full meaning of the important words you want to convey.

Tone:

Adjust your vocal quality to match your audience. Support your tone with a breath that stems from deep in your body cavity. Relax your tongue and throat, and allow your words to flow from a mouth that seems to savor them.

Your vocal quality or timbre, the way you articulate, and the rise and fall of your voice all contribute to your tone. Like the melody line of a song, you’re composing and singing your message all day long.

Rhythm:

Who are you speaking to? How much time do they have? How long is their attention span? What are their interests, beliefs and values? What do they share in common with others? How are they unique?

Each of these factors will influence the rhythm of your speech.

If you’ve been asked to give a eulogy at a good friend’s funeral, by all means, take your time. The dearly departed has probably earned it. There’s no shortcut here, and the members of the congregation are sure to appreciate the display of respect demonstrated in your slow, measured speech, savoring every last detail you painstakingly convey in your somber pace.

Slow thoughtful speech is the hallmark of a eulogy. If that’s your venue, take your time. Otherwise, cut to the chase.

Brevity is the soul of wisdom, and the rhythm of your speech has the power to convey a world of urgency or a casual note of nonchalance. Match your pace to the audience before you.

What do you want your audience to do as a result of your communication? What’s really at the heart of your message? By effectively using your voice in a measured, deliberate way, you can pack a powerful punch that drives your message home.

Communication is at the heart of all relationships and business dealings. Whether you’re connecting with an audience of one or a thousand, your experience can be a rich and rewarding one. Using your voice to full effect will mean the all the difference in creating a lasting impression.

Looking for additional skills for communicating effectively? Want to be a “master communicator” and the one people really listen too? Looking to become one of the top PMP’s in your area?

Join us at the #NewNormSummit event, January 9th, 2015. One day event, limited seating. 10 Category A PDUs plus a 10 PDUs course. 20 PDUs total.

Click here to learn more and register.

Decoding Body Language

Body Lamguage

Decoding Body Language: What You’re Secretly Communicating About Your Leadership

What are you saying with your body language?

Like it or not, your non-verbal communication speaks louder than your words.  Many times, it’s not exactly what you intended to say.  If your team is headed in the wrong direction, you might want to step back, decode your body language and decipher what you are really telling them.

Imagine a time before the spoken word, thousands of years ago when cavemen relied on gestures and eye contact for communication. At that time, it was prudent to speak out loud only when necessary to avoid scaring away big game or attracting deadly enemies. It’s hard to imagine now that language and syntax were concepts barely in their infancy. With populations so sparse, body language was the common speech.

During those times, a simple gesture or puffing out of the chest to the clan leader at the wrong time in the wrong way could have someone in hot water or ostracized from the tribe. Meanwhile, averting the eyes at just the right moment might win over an attractive member of the opposite sex.

Here we are today in modern times dealing with the same classic issues with body language and communication. What do you think would happen if you stood up in the middle of a meeting and puffed out your chest to the division manager? Worse yet, what might happen if you turned your back when someone on your team was talking with you?Sending the right message with your non-verbals is keenly important. Your voice inflection is part of that message, but it’s not the total package.What does your body language say? Does it say you’re confident, smart, and enthusiastic—or just the opposite?

If you want to learn how to decode your body language and lead your teams more effectively, consider these practical tips below. As an added bonus, they might just help you advance your career.

Eyes:

The eyes truly are the windows to the soul. Be sure you’re making eye contact with those you’re having a conversation with. Glancing around the room, looking past someone or simply phasing out all indicate that you’re just not engaged in the conversation.

If you’re leading a meeting, eye contact with your audience is even more important. Keep your eyes focused on those you’re speaking with, and you’re half-way home to winning their trust.

Posture:

Your posture conveys a number of factors to the people you’re with, including how you feel about your topic and even your energy level. If you’re slouched, resting your chin on your hands or crossing your legs, you’re conveying a casual attitude. This can be a big benefit in certain situations, but be careful. It can also imply carelessness.

Standing solidly on two feet conveys strength and energy. With your weight distributed on the balls of your feet, you’re ready to move. Square shoulders and chin up display confidence and self-respect.

The great thing about displaying good posture is that, even when you’re not feeling confident and interested, adopting this body language will help you feel brighter and more energetic immediately.

Arms & Hands:

When your hands are open, you’re ready to receive. With your arms outstretched or at your sides, you’re in a neutral or even a welcoming position.
Folding your arms across your chest is a great way to keep warm. After all, you’re covering your vital organs, including your heart. But it also could convey a closed attitude. Be careful how you use this gesture.

Feet:

You may be surprised to learn that your feet are talking as much as your hands are, telling the story of your interest in the conversation. If you’re looking at someone but your feet are pointed toward the door, guess which way you sub-consciously want to move.

Crossing your ankles or legs indicates a casual stance or even a feeling a comfort. You’re certainly not about to go anywhere in that posture. But here again, be clear about what you want to convey. This can be great for bridging the gap, but it also could be inappropriate in formal settings. Understand what’s standing under you.

Distance:

Everyone has a comfort zone, that personal space they’ll let you into. If you come closer than arm’s length, you’re likely to incite strong feelings – either of romance or anger. When you’re talking with someone, don’t encroach into their personal zone unless you’re absolutely sure you’re invited.

Using these tips for non-verbal communication may not win you any public speaking awards. On the other hand, they’ll help you keep your feet on the ground where they belong – and out of your mouth!

 
 
 
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